Imperialist Obama Covering for Guatemalan Guerrilla

Marxist Judicial Officials, Terrorism Apologists Enjoy US Support

EspañolStatement by Liga Pro Patria

The United States, under President Obama, is helping radical anti-Americans take power in our country.

Guatemala: Paz y Paz with then-US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2011. (<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/usembassyguatemala/5864080998/" target="_blank">US Embassy, Guatemala</a>)

Paz y Paz with then-US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2011. (US Embassy, Guatemala)

Since 2010, the US embassy has been openly supporting the activities of terrorists whose predecessors tried and failed to seize power in Guatemala before the peace accords of 1996.

Under the rule of Attorney General Claudia Paz y Paz, who took office in December 2010, the Ministry of Justice became an arm of the violent and criminal guerrilla left. As minister, Paz y Paz encouraged leftist militias by shielding them from criminal prosecution and by imposing rules that supported their illegal activities.

At the same time, the Justice Ministry prosecuted law-enforcement officials who tried to restrain the criminal activities of groups protected by the attorney general.

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Seizer-in-Chief Obama Eyes Cyber Hackers’ Goods

Broad Definition of "Threat" Opens Door for Widespread Prosecution

US President Barack Obama has signed an executive order that declares hacking a “national emergency” and imposes sanctions to seize their property and effects. (@Independent)

US President Barack Obama has signed an executive order that declares hacking a “national emergency” and imposes sanctions to seize their property and effects. (@Independent)

If cyber hackers are aiming their malicious code at US companies or government bureaus, they now face the wrath of brutal sanctions.

That’s the latest law of the land to come from President Barack Obama’s pen — a new executive order signed on Wednesday in which he declared cyber attacks a “national emergency” and ordered the punishment and sanction of foreign hackers.

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Leaders, Laureates, and Loved Ones Denounce Maduro in Lima

Fourth Annual International Freedom Foundation Forum Takes on Venezuelan Regime

Literature Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa along with Mitzy Capriles de Ledezma, wife of detained Caracas mayor Antonio Ledezma, and Lilian Tintori, wife of political prisoner Leopoldo López in Venezuela.

Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa addresses the fourth annual International Freedom Foundation Conference. (María Corina Machado)

EspañolThere were multiple panels during the fourth annual forum organized by the International Freedom Foundation (FIL) and Peru’s Citel Institute, on March 26 and 27 in Lima, Peru, but a common denominator stood out: the ongoing economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela.

Peruvian Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa, sitting president of FIL, gave the opening keynote speech at the University of Lima, drawing world leaders and academics alike.

Saying that “freedom in Venezuela is under fierce attack” and “the situation there couldn’t be more dire,” Vargas Llosa claimed that for Venezuela’s president, “Nicolás Maduro, the only crime committed by the political prisoners is to love freedom.” He explained that the Venezuelan government “carries out Stalinist legal persecution against anyone who expresses opposition.”

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Cuba Comes In from the Cold: Thanks to Diplomatic Hypocrisy

OAS Politicking Hangs the Cuban People Out to Dry

The election of Miguel Insulza as secretary general of the OAS has lead to an about-face on Cuba's suspension. (Juan Manuel Herrera/OAS)

The election of Miguel Insulza as secretary general of the OAS has lead to an about-face on Cuba’s suspension. (Juan Manuel Herrera/OAS)

​Español​ The Organization of American States (OAS) summit due to be held in Panama on April 10 will mark Cuba’s return after a 53-year-old absence in the Pan-American organization. For 47 years Cuba has been banned from participating in the meetings of the regional body, and for six more it refused to take up its seat.

“Cuba can come back into the OAS in the future if the OAS decides that its participation meets the purposes and principles of the organization, including democracy and human rights,” said then-US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in 2009, when Cuba’s exclusion from the OAS was lifted.

However, the communist regime kept refusing to take part “in a disgraceful institution that has only humiliated the honor of Latin-American nations,” as former Cuban dictator Fidel Castro put it in 2005.

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Latin America: A Burgeoning Market for US Drones

Washington Green Light Means UAVs Coming to Skies Near You

Español The passage of a new Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) export policy in February will enable US defense companies to begin exporting drone technology to nations approved by the United States government. This new initiative has been welcomed by the defense industry, but also by numerous US allies who have long coveted the enhanced capabilities that come with drones.

Unmanned reconnaissance technology is an incredibly valuable tool, especially considering that many modern security threats come from non-state actors. Drones have been operating in both “kinetic” (or combat) and ISR (intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) roles for over a decade — proving their value time and time again.

The image we have of drone operations largely consists of a few grainy frames of Department of Defense footage, 5,000 miles away in a desert war zone. Soon, however, the same images could have a tropical backdrop.

Violence, Not Power: Maduro’s Ailing Regime

Chavista Brutality Only Betrays Weakness

EspañolVenezuela’s democracy is in crisis: perhaps the deepest in its history. All areas of life have been affected by total political and economic failure. But those who believe the Venezuelan government wields absolute power are mistaken. Mounting repression and violence instead show that the regime of Nicolás Maduro is getting weaker.

Maduro's institutionalization of violence proves that power no longer resides with the Chavistas.

Maduro’s institutionalization of violence proves that power no longer resides with the Chavistas. (Wikimedia)

There’s no need for exhaustive research to find out who is to blame. Everyone who isn’t a supporter of Chavismo knows that the fault rests with the government. Many claim the Maduro administration betrayed Chávez’s legacy; the truth is that the late president’s diktats have never been more faithfully enforced.

Maduro was just unlucky enough that the destructive policies instituted by the czar of the Chavista economy Jorge Giordani — who now shamelessly condemns them — were finally exposed during his term in office by plummeting oil prices and rampant inflation.

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Alcohol Prohibition Looms for Uruguay

Everything Looks Like a Nail to the President with the Government Hammer

Español It might seem hard to believe that the same country that decriminalized marijuana [1] is now facing a law that aims to declare a war on alcoholic drinks, although Uruguayan officials have thus far insisted that it is far from what prohibition once was in the United States.

Nevertheless, on his first day as president (March 1), Tabaré Vázquez announced he would take strong measures against the excessive intake of alcohol, and 25 days later he convened a first meeting with the opposition, the Beverage Union, Alcoholics Anonymous, and the director of the National Board of Drugs, Milton Romani. The purpose was clear and allegedly “positive”: to limit the alcohol consumption of Uruguayans.

Today's meeting over how to curtail Uruguay's purported problem of alcohol consumption. (Maldonado Noticias)

Today’s meeting over how to curtail Uruguay’s purported problem of alcohol consumption. (Maldonado Noticias)

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Recovering the Libertarian Tradition of Magna Carta

Great Anti-Power Document Turns 800 Years Old on June 15

Grabado de la firma de la Magna Carta, que está cumpliendo 800 años en 2015 (Historic UK)

Magna Carta, which turns 800 in 2015, is more than a peace treaty between a desperate monarch and his rebellious barons. (Historic UK)

EspañolBy Joaquín Rodríguez

There are some misguided beliefs about history that prevent us from seeing the course of events that led to modern constitutional democracies, and the protection of our individual liberties against overreaching power.

We usually think this freedom starts in the modern era, with universal suffrage, national independence, or popular revolution. However, historical events are less democratic and idealistic than many wish them to be. Instead, democratic rights were acquired the hard way: an 800-year slog of trial and error, accident and design, by those that came before us.

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Bonil and Rayma: Cartoonists Speak Truth to Power

Venezuelan and Ecuadorian Satirists Defend Right to "Blaspheme"

Suprani and Bonilla address the Cartoons in Times of Authoritarianism conference in Washington, DC.

Suprani and Bonilla address the Cartoons in Times of Authoritarianism conference in Washington, DC. (PanAm Post)

Español“These cartoonists have been able to mock power.” This is how Héctor Schamis, Georgetown University professor and El País columnist, introduced Venezuela’s Rayma Suprani and Ecuador’s Xavier Bonilla both of whom have been targeted by their respective governments.

Bonilla and Suprani were featured speakers at the “Cartoons in Times of Authoritarianism” conference hosted by human-rights advocacy NGO Freedom House on March 18 in Washington, DC.

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The Manipulation of Student Struggles in Honduras

Outside Agitators will Lead to Misguided Martyrs

Protesters purporting to be students throw rocks at police in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Protesters purporting to be students throw rocks at police in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. (La Prensa)

EspañolHistorically, heroes have often emerged from the ranks of a country’s student population, traditionally a seedbed of rebellion and passionate outrage. In many cases, from the US civil rights movement to protests against communist repression in China and the former Soviet Union, students have been the first to speak out against injustice.

In Latin America, students have also been at the forefront of social struggles. In 1968 in Tlatelolco, Mexico, the government massacred around a hundred student demonstrators in the city’s Plaza de las Tres Culturas. History repeated itself in 2014 with the disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa.

It was also students who lead the protests against the authoritarian government of Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in 2014.

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