Fed-Up Hondurans Protest for Change after Corruption Scandal

Social-Security Fraud Deepens, Fans the Flames of Public Fury

The torch has become the symbol of opposition in Honduras during demonstrations against government corruption. (Oposición indignada HN)

The torch has become the symbol of Honduran opposition during demonstrations against government corruption. (Indignant Opposition Honduras)

EspañolA growing number of street protests asking for justice have taken place in Honduras following a series of corruption scandals at the Honduran Institute for Social Security (IHSS). Government party members, businessmen, and public employees are all involved and local media suggests that investigations could expand to include other political parties and public figures as well.

Timeline of Crisis in Honduras

In 2014, President Juan Orlando Hernández ordered the creation of an auditory commission to investigate alleged IHSS misconduct. The commission discovered that the amount of corruption involved was much greater than initially suspected.

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Love or Hate Abercrombie & Fitch, They Have Rights Too

The First Amendment Is Not an Employment Mandate

By Anne Butcher

EspañolAbercrombie & Fitch is the sort of company that makes people hate freedom. The Supreme Court recently manifested this sentiment when they ruled it was illegal for the company to use their “look policy” to discriminate against Muslims in headscarves.

Since employment discrimination is (rightfully) unpopular, it would seem that giving companies the freedom to do so is a bad idea, because they might take advantage of it. However, taking this freedom away from Abercrombie isn’t right either, because people who run businesses have rights too.

Samantha Elauf modeling fashion consistent with her Muslim dress code, but unacceptable to Abercrombie and Fitch. (Aslan Media)

Samantha Elauf modeling fashion consistent with her Muslim dress code, but unacceptable to Abercrombie and Fitch. (Aslan Media)

If you’re unfamiliar with EEOC v. Abercrombie and Fitch Stores, it all started in 2008 when Samantha Elauf was rejected for a job at one of Abercrombie’s retail stores, allegedly because of the headscarf she wears for religious reasons. Abercrombie’s dress code prohibits “caps” and management felt the headscarf qualified. The Supreme Court ruled 8-1 that this was a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which says that religion cannot be a motivating factor in hiring decisions.

However, all employers have rules about what employees can and can’t wear while working. Most clothing retail stores expect their sales clerks to represent the brand: a position which most people can sympathize with.

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Down with Correa! Ecuadorians Want Off the Socialist Train

Five Days of Street Protests, More to Come

Thousands gathered in Guayaquil on Friday, June 12, to protest the socialist government of Rafael Correa.

Thousands gathered in Guayaquil on Friday, June 12, to protest the socialist government of Rafael Correa. (PanAm Post)

EspañolOn Friday, June 12, thousands of Ecuadorians finished off a week of street protests. New taxes on inheritances and “surplus profit” of real-estate transactions promoted by President Rafael Correa appear to have been the last straw. These measures have generated such social unrest among the public that thousands have taken to the streets for five consecutive days.

A march called by the opposition via social media took place in Guayaquil at the Plaza Centenario at 5:00 p.m. local time. Ecuadorian authorities announced an amendment to the inheritance tax just before the protest, but it was not enough to calm the public’s anger. Gradually, several groups of people, mostly dressed in black, arrived at the site with banners, flags, and whistles.

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The Magna Carta’s Legacy Lives On

1215 Document Set Precedent for the Respect of Individual Rights

The Magna Carta is the first written document recognizing the rights of the subjects before their king and a landmark for modern political thought.

The Magna Carta is the first written document recognizing the rights of the subjects before their king and a landmark for modern political thought. (The Shakespeare Blog)

EspañolBy Roberto Sánchez Fuentes

The Magna Carta is a historic document that represents a quantitative leap in political sophistication. French historian Jacques Le Goff thought the Magna Carta was the key instrument that made it possible to restrict the power of the monarchy in 13th-century England.

With time, it helped to create vital political stability and became an effective limit on how the sovereign could act toward his subjects, especially the barons, clergy, and the bourgeoisie.

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The Castros Are Shaking in Their Boots at Yankee Tourists

Because English-Speaking Sunbathers, Partygoers Carry the Torch of Democracy

US tourists would much rather drink mojitos than bother with converting the Castros' totalitarian regime. (<a href="https://flic.kr/p/4Jf2Ni" target="_blank">fiat.luxury</a>)

US tourists would much rather drink mojitos than bother with converting the Castros’ totalitarian regime. (fiat.luxury)

The proposition seems intuitively reasonable: US tourists will help bring democracy to Cuba. But, it is also demonstrably false.

The idea that US tourists, innately imbued with democratic values and norms, will proudly reflect and share those values while traveling abroad is an authentic premise. Thus, we view them as ambassadors for democracy, and a powerful force in communicating the virtues of democratic governance.

And whereas this may indeed be the case, it does not follow with syllogistic certainty that such ambassadorship can bring about the empowerment of the citizenry in a totalitarian regime.

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Kirchner Lives in a Fool’s Paradise

Lies Rub Salt into the Wound of Argentina's Poverty

(Argentinean Ministry of Culture, Joseph Siess)

President Cristina Kirchner isn’t fazed by poverty visible right by the main Buenos Aires bus station. (Argentinean Ministry of Culture, Joseph Siess)

By Joseph Siess

EspañolA cannonade of criticism exploded in the Argentinean press and across social media in lieu of President Cristina Kirchner’s absurd remarks in Rome on Monday.

President Fernández stood up at the UN Food and Agriculture Office (FAO) and claimed that Argentina’s poverty level is “below 5 percent, and 1 percent severe poverty.” Then on Tuesday, Argentinean Chief of Staff Aníbal Fernández got on FM Blue radio and claimed that the country was doing better than Denmark and Germany.

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Venezuelan Universities Must Speak Truth to Power

To Hold One's Tongue Is to Acquiesce

Venezuela

The current generation of Venezuelans has greater obligations beyond just studying. (El Nacional)

EspañolBy Andrea Rondón García

No Venezuelan can ignore what our country is experiencing. We all ask ourselves, “How can we contribute to changing these painful times we are living through?”

As a former student at Venezuela’s Central University, and now a lawyer and professor, I’ve noticed a shift among students and staff: there is a need now, more than ever, to understand the country we live in, and make sure classes are not divorced from reality.

This awareness compels us to be active, to be politicians in the philosophical sense of the word, and concern ourselves with public affairs.

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#30M Protests Prove Unity Rests with the People, Not Politicos

Venezuelans Rise above MUD Division

People gathered in more than 30 Venezuelan cities on May 30 to demand the release of political prisoners.

People gathered in more than 30 Venezuelan cities on May 30 to demand the release of political prisoners. (Diario Sin)

EspañolIt all started on Saturday, May 23, when Leopoldo López released a video urging Venezuelan civil society to demonstrate and demand the government release all political prisoners and set a date for this year’s legislative elections.

However, instead of joining the protest, the coalition of opposition parties known as the Democratic Unity Roundtable (MUD) announced they would not officially endorse López’s call for renewed protests.

The secretary general of those who purportedly represent the forefront of political resistance against Chavismo in Venezuela explained that López had not “consulted” with the MUD, and therefore he could not support the rally.

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Thorium Nuclear to End Puerto Rico’s Energy Woes

Next-Generation Indian Design Alleviates Environmental Concerns

EspañolPuerto Rico is now fixated on a plan to save its troubled utility, the Electric Power Authority, known as PREPA. Outdated equipment, the burning of fuel oil, mismanagement, and public-sector unions have turned the utility into a geriatric dinosaur.

The solution? Raise rates. Again.

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